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If you need emergency HELP NOW dial 911. If you need INFORMATION call The Iowa Substance Abuse Information Center at 866-242-4111.

Drug-Free Workplace Programs
Alcohol and other drug abuse affect the profitability of a company. It also impacts absenteeism, tardiness, and productivity rates; workman’s compensation claims; and the overall climate of the workplace.

Consider this:
·77% of drug abusers are employed. (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
·Substance abusers are 33-50% less productive (National Institute on Drug Abuse)
·Abusers are absent 30-35 days per year and are three times more likely than non-users to be late for work. (U.S. Chamber of Commerce)
·Abusers are three to four times more likely to have an accident on the job and five times more likely to file a workers’ compensation claim. (Employee Assistance Society of North America)
·21% of workers report being injured or put in danger, having to re-do work or cover for another employee, or needing to work harder due to others’ drinking. (JSI Research and Training Institute)

Drug-free workplace education programs are designed to assist employers as they work to create a healthier, safer environment for their employees and to address substance abuse in the workplace.

There are a variety of programs that can assist employers in establishing drug-free workplace policies, and also provide education and training to employees and those in supervisory roles.

Listed below are several resources.
Creating a Drug-Free Workplace
“Creating a Drug-Free Workplace” was developed by Iowans for Iowans, with Human Resource Professionals, managers, and business owners in mind. The curriculum contains everything needed to implement a comprehensive program in both large and small businesses, including Employee Education and Supervisor Training modules. For more information contact:

Becky Swift
Office of Drug Control Policy
515-281-5593
Becky.swift@iowa.gov

Peter Komendowski
PDFI – FIT
319-269-8493
pkomendowski@gmail.com

Drug-free Workplace Programs
Basic Components: No two workplaces are the same and no two employers will take exactly the same approach to addressing concerns about alcohol and other drug abuse. What’s right for an employer with 200 employees, many of whom drive company vehicles, will be very different from the needs of an employer with only 8 employees who work on computers all day. What to include depends on your level of concern about the problem, the potential for abuse at the worksite, and the available resources.

There is no one “right” way to start a drug-free workplace program, but most successful programs include several of the components shown and explained below.

Iowa Code specifies that companies who use drug testing must also include each of the other program components in their overall drug-free workplace program. General information about complying with Iowa Code is included in this kit, but it is not all-inclusive and does not constitute legal advice. You are encouraged to review the actual code and seek legal counsel before implementing drug testing or a drug-free workplace policy and program.

Policy Development: A written policy is the central component of most programs. It tells
everyone the organization’s position on alcohol and other drug abuse and explains what will happen if the policy is violated. Many employers find it beneficial to involve supervisors, employees, even union representatives in the drafting of a policy. You should always get legal review by an attorney experienced in labor and employment matters before implementing a policy.

Iowa’s drug testing law requires employers who use drug testing to provide a detailed, written policy to every employee subject to testing prior to the implementation of a drug testing program.

Employee Education: Introducing your drug-free workplace education program to employees and informing them about alcohol and other drug-related issues is important.

Iowa’s drug testing law requires employers who use drug testing to establish an education program to inform employees about the dangers of alcohol and other drug use in the workplace.

The training modules in this kit have been designed to help you comply with the Iowa Code’s requirements. Most of the state’s licensed substance abuse agencies also offer workplace training for a modest fee that can be negotiated on an agency-by-agency basis.

Supervisor Training: People in supervisory positions are often closest to employees; therefore, they are an important support group for implementing your policy and increasing employee awareness of alcohol and other drugs. To do this they will need the right knowledge and skills.

Iowa’s drug testing law requires employers who use drug testing to provide supervisors with 2 hours of alcohol and drug abuse training during the first year of implementation and 1 hour of training each year thereafter. This training must include but is not limited to:
· Recognizing evidence of employee abuse of alcohol and other drugs.
· Documenting and corroborating substance abuse by employees.
· Referring abusing employees to an Employee Assistance Program or to an assistance resource file maintained by the employer.

The training modules in this kit have been designed to help you comply with the Iowa Code’s requirements. Most of the state’s licensed substance abuse agencies also offer workplace training for a modest fee that can be negotiated on an agency-by-agency basis.

Treatment and Support: Providing an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) or other treatment and support services is one way you can help connect troubled employees with counseling or treatment for alcohol, drug and other problems. Treatment works 86% of the time. It’s one way to show your care and concern for employees and substance abuse issues, and it can save you the cost and inconvenience of replacing a valued employee.

Iowa’s drug testing law requires employers who use drug testing to establish – prior to testing – either an Employee Assistance Program or a resource file where employees can access help for substance abuse problems.

Drug Testing: Drug testing can help protect your workplace from the negative affects of alcohol and drug abuse by identifying substance users. A drug testing program can deter people from coming to work unfit for duty and also discourage alcohol and other drug abusers from joining your organization in the first place. But it can also create controversy, anxiety and concern, so the decision to include testing in your program is an important one.

Iowa Code is very specific about what types of companies can use drug testing, how and when drug testing can be done, and what other responsibilities employers have to inform employees of their drug testing practices and support treatment for employees with alcohol and other drug abuse problems. You should get legal advice and review the complete text of Iowa Code 730.5 before implementing a drug testing program.

Evaluation Program: Evaluation is an important part of any drug-free workplace program because it lets you know if you are saving money, improving your bottom line or reducing workplace problems related to alcohol and other drug abuse. There are several ways to evaluate your program. Some employers hire a consultant while others elect to conduct their own evaluations.

If You Can’t Do It All,Do Something
Even the smallest organization with minimal resources can support a drug-free workplace. For example, even if you can’t offer insurance coverage for treatment, you can help your employees and save hiring and training costs by assuring continued employment if they successfully seek treatment on their own and helping them find local treatment resources. Or you can implement the program in phases – starting with a policy, supervisor training and employee education, then adding other components at a later time.